Port Canaveral Completes Basin and Container Berth Deepening Project

By Curious

Port Canaveral has completed the deepening of the West Turning Basin, which now allows deeper draft access to the Port's container cargo facility operated by GT USA at North Cargo Berth 5 and 6. The 6-month project deepened the West Turning Basin to the authorized depth of -43 feet plus 2 feet additional overdredge, complimenting the existing authorized Port channel depth of -44 feet.

Port Canaveral Completes Basin and Container Berth Deepening Project
Caption: West Turning Basin at Port Canaveral

The channel is clear from overhead obstructions such as bridges, wires, and has no air draft restrictions. With the channel to the West turning Basin and approximately 2,000 feet of quay now at -43 feet, Port Canaveral boasts one of the deepest draft and working cargo berths with no air draft limitation between Miami and Norfolk.

“The West Turning Basin deepening was necessary for Port Canaveral to allow larger cargo vessels safe access into our Port,” stated Captain John Murray, Port CEO. “This project opens the Port to bigger, modern industrial ships, vital to Central Florida’s economic success.  We will experience a continued growth of cargo into the region, making Port Canaveral more competitive and increased economic opportunities.”

More than 826,000 cubic yards of dredged material was removed by dredging contractor, Dutra Group. All work was performed under specific conditions of environmental permits issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).

Caption: West Turning Basin during dredging operation at Port Canaveral

With the deepening project complete, Port Canaveral is currently in the bidding process to purchase a mobile harbor crane, with an 18/19 container reach. The crane is expected to be fully operational by the end of 2018.

Total cost for the project was $7.5 million dollars, with approximately 75 percent of the cost covered by a Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Strategic Intermodal System (SIS) grant.

Source: Port Canaveral